Identifying relevant data for pages in a social networking system

Abstract

Embodiments of the invention improve the ability of a social networking system to determine which types of data—hereinafter referred to as “fields”—are relevant to which types of user pages. Specifically, a social networking system assigns page types to different user pages, and likewise stores information on different types of fields. By analyzing the relationships of different pages and fields, the social networking system determines which types of fields are particularly well-suited for inclusion on different types of pages. Using the learned information about page types and field types, the social networking system can better aid page administrators in specifying data to add to their pages. For example, the social networking system can recommend to administrators the addition of certain types of fields or automatically add the fields. Further, the social networking system can specialize a search for social networking system data to field types.

Claims

What is claimed is: 1. A computer-implemented method comprising: providing an interface by a social networking system to a page administrator, the interface comprising controls for administering a page in the social networking system; identifying a plurality of field objects added by page administrators to pages hosted by the social networking system and administered by the administrators; identifying field types of the added field objects, wherein at least one of the field types is the field type for a plurality of the field objects; identifying page types of the pages to which the field objects were added, wherein at least one of the page types is the page type for a plurality of the pages; determining, based on the identified field types and on the identified page types, a degree of association of a first field type with a first page type; determining that the degree of association of the first field type with the first page type is greater than a threshold degree of association, some pages of the first page type lacking fields of the first field type; determining, for a first page of the social network, that the first page lacks a field of the first field type; and responsive to determining that the degree of association of the first field type with the first page type is greater than the threshold degree of association, and that the first page lacks a field of the first type, initiating an addition of a field of the first field type to the first page without a request therefor from a first administrator of the first page. 2. The computer-implemented method of claim 1 , wherein initiating the addition comprises automatically adding a field of the first field type to the first page. 3. The computer-implemented method of claim 1 , wherein initiating the addition of the field to the first page is responsive to determining that the degree of association of the first field type with the first page type is greater than the threshold degree of association and comprises adding a user interface element within a user interface used by the first administrator to administer the first page, the user interface element visually identifying the first type, and wherein administrator selection of the user interface element causes a field of the first type to be added to the first page. 4. The computer-implemented method of claim 1 , wherein initiating the addition comprises: providing, within a user interface used by the first administrator to administer the first page, a selector having an associated context that includes field types; receiving textual input that was entered into the selector on a client device; forming a result set by identifying field types matching the textual input; and providing the result set to the client device for display in visual association with the selector. 5. The computer-implemented method of claim 4 , further comprising: determining whether the field types of the result set are associated with a page type of the first page; and ranking the field types of the result set based on the determination. 6. The computer-implemented method of claim 1 , wherein the page types and the field types correspond to nodes in a type graph of related types. 7. The computer-implemented method of claim 1 , wherein the pages comprise a first page having a first one of the page types and a second page having the same first one of the page types, and wherein the first page comprises a field object having a field type that is not the field type of any field object of the second page. 8. The computer-implemented method of claim 1 , wherein determining the degree of association of the first field type with the first page type comprises determining a number of times that a field object of the first field type was added to a page of the first page type. 9. The computer-implemented method of claim 1 , further comprising determining that the first page has the first page type, wherein the initiating the addition of the field is performed responsive to determining that the first page has the first page type. 10. The computer-implemented method of claim 1 , wherein determining the degree of association of the first field type with the first page type comprises determining a percentage of times that a field object of the first field type was added to a page of the first page type. 11. A non-transitory computer-readable storage medium storing executable computer program instructions comprising: instructions for providing an interface by a social networking system to a page administrator, the interface comprising controls for administering a page in the social networking system; instructions for identifying a plurality of field objects added by page administrators to pages hosted by the social networking system and administered by the administrators; instructions for identifying field types of the added field objects, wherein at least one of the field types is the field type for a plurality of the field objects; instructions for identifying page types of the pages to which the field objects were added, wherein at least one of the page types is the page type for a plurality of the pages; instructions for determining, based on the identified field types and on the identified page types, a degree of association of a first field type with a first page type instructions for determining that the degree of association of the first field type with the first page type is greater than a threshold degree of association, some pages of the first page type lacking fields of the first field type; instructions for determining, for a first page of the social network, that the first page lacks a field of the first field type: and instructions for, responsive to determining that the degree of association of the first field type with the first page type is greater than the threshold degree of association, and that the first page lacks a field of the first type, initiating an addition of a field of the first field type to the first page without a request therefor from a first administrator of the first page. 12. The non-transitory computer-readable storage medium of claim 11 , wherein initiating the addition comprises automatically adding a field of the first field type to the first page. 13. The non-transitory computer-readable storage medium of claim 11 , wherein initiating the addition comprises adding a user interface element within a user interface used by the first administrator to administer the first page, the user interface element visually identifying the first type, and wherein administrator selection of the user interface element causes a field of the first type to be added to the first page. 14. The non-transitory computer-readable storage medium of claim 11 , wherein initiating the addition comprises: providing, within a user interface used by the first administrator to administer the first page, a selector having an associated context that includes field types; receiving textual input that was entered into the selector on a client device; forming a result set by identifying field types matching the textual input; and providing the result set to the client device for display in visual association with the selector. 15. The non-transitory computer-readable storage medium of claim 14 , further comprising: instructions for determining whether the field types of the result set are associated with a page type of the first page; and instructions for ranking the field types of the result set based on the determination. 16. The non-transitory computer-readable storage medium of claim 11 , wherein the page types and the field types correspond to nodes in a type graph of related types. 17. A computer system comprising: a computer processor; and a computer program executable by the computer processor, comprising: instructions for providing a graphical user interface by a social networking system to a page administrator, the graphical user interface comprising controls for administering a page in the social networking system; instructions for identifying a plurality of field objects added using the graphical user interface by page administrators to pages hosted by the social networking system and administered by the administrators; instructions for identifying field types of the plurality of field objects added to the pages, wherein at least one of the field types is the field type for a plurality of the field objects, and wherein the at least one of the field types is added to some but not all of the pages; instructions for identifying page types of the pages to which the field objects were added, wherein at least one of the page types is the page type for a plurality of the pages; instructions for determining, based on the identified field types and on the identified page types, a degree of association of a first field type with a first page type; determining that the degree of association of the first field type with the first page type is greater than a threshold degree of association, some pages of the first page type lacking fields of the first field type; instructions for determining, for a first page of the social network, that the first page lacks a field of the first field type; and instructions for, responsive to determining that the degree of association of the first field type with the first page type is greater than the threshold degree of association, and that the first page lacks a field of the first type, initiating an addition of a field of the first field type to the first page without a request therefor from a first administrator of the first page. 18. The computer system of claim 17 , wherein initiating the addition comprises automatically adding a field of the first field type to the first page. 19. The computer system of claim 17 , wherein initiating the addition comprises adding a user interface element within a user interface used by the first administrator to administer the first page, the user interface element visually identifying the first type, and wherein administrator selection of the user interface element causes a field of the first type to be added to the first page. 20. The computer system of claim 17 , wherein initiating the addition comprises: providing, within a user interface used by the first administrator to administer the first page, a selector having an associated context that includes field types; receiving textual input that was entered into the selector on a client device; forming a result set by identifying field types matching the textual input; and providing the result set to the client device for display in visual association with the selector. 21. The computer system of claim 20 , the computer program further comprising: instructions for determining whether the field types of the result set are associated with a page type of the first page; and instructions for ranking the field types of the result set based on the determination.
BACKGROUND The present invention generally relates to the field of computer data storage, and more specifically, to determining which types of information are particularly relevant to which types of pages hosted by a social networking system. Some social networking systems allow users to create and administer pages for the viewing and use of other users of the system. For example, a restaurant business might create a presence on a social networking system including a set of pages (e.g., data based on which the social networking system dynamically generates corresponding web pages). Certain types of pages tend to have certain types of data associated with them, such as most pages for restaurants (or other businesses) including data on their hours of business. However, it is difficult for the social networking system, or other users, to manually generate and maintain the correspondences between different types of pages and different types of data. Thus, in many cases users are required to determine what types of data to add to their pages, without support from the social networking system. SUMMARY Embodiments of the invention improve the ability of a social networking system to determine which types of data—hereinafter referred to as “fields”—are relevant to which types of user pages. Specifically, a social networking system assigns page types to different user pages, and likewise stores information on different types of fields. By analyzing the relationships of different pages and fields, the social networking system determines which types of fields are particularly well-suited for inclusion on different types of pages. Using the learned information about page types and field types, the social networking system can better aid page administrators in specifying data to add to their pages. For example, the social networking system can recommend to administrators the addition of certain types of fields or automatically add the fields. Further, the social networking system can specialize a search for social networking system data to field types, allowing administrators to choose from those types, and can further rank the field type results based on how well they correspond to the type of page to which the search applies. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS FIGS. 1A and 1B provide examples of the use of selectors in different contexts. FIG. 2 is a high-level block diagram of a computing environment, according to one embodiment. FIG. 3 depicts an example of a hierarchy for categorizing pages and other objects of a social networking system, according to one embodiment. FIG. 4 is a flowchart depicting the operations performed when learning the type(s) associated with a given selector, according to one embodiment. FIG. 5 is a flowchart depicting the operations performed by a selector in response to a search for objects, according to one embodiment. FIG. 6 illustrates a sample page administrator user interface for a fictional bookstore. The figures depict embodiments of the present invention for purposes of illustration only. One skilled in the art will readily recognize from the following description that alternative embodiments of the structures and methods illustrated herein may be employed without departing from the principles of the invention described herein. DETAILED DESCRIPTION Example User Interfaces FIGS. 1A and 1B are screen shots providing examples of “selectors,” user interface elements of a social networking system that allow users to search for and locate objects of the social networking system that are particularly relevant to the context in which the search takes place. For example, FIG. 1A depicts a portion of a web-based user interface 101 for a toy store. The user interface 101 includes a selector 105 , implemented as a text entry area, into which a user has entered the characters “ra”, the first two characters of a (presumably longer) query for items within the stock of the toy store. In response to the entry of the characters in the selector 105 , the social networking system has provided a corresponding set of search results 110 , each item of which matches the entered characters. (Specifically, each of the objects in the search results 110 has a name with a word for which the entered characters are a prefix. For example, the entered characters “ra” are a prefix to the words “Razor,” “Ray,” “race,” “Randomized,” and “Ray,” in the search results 110 .) The use of the selector 105 to retrieve objects of the social networking system allows the toy store web page to quickly provide suggestions to users about what they are searching for, even though the user has only typed a few characters, which is a great user convenience. Note that the selector 105 exists within the context of a page for a toy store, and more specifically, corresponds to a search of the stock of the toy store. In contrast, the social networking system may include data on an enormous number of distinct objects (e.g., millions or billions) of widely varying types (e.g., people, places, events, or things), not all of which will be relevant to the search. Thus, it would be particularly beneficial to a user to emphasize the objects that are relevant to the search context, rather than merely selecting objects based purely on the characters entered into the selector 105 . Accordingly, the search results 110 of the selector 105 emphasize objects corresponding to products, such as the razor scooters, ray guns, car race tracks, and games corresponding to objects 110 A-D. The search results 110 also include a web page for a person—a fictitious celebrity named “Ray Allend”—having a name matching the entered characters, and included due to the celebrity's immense popularity. However, the page is given a lower rank in the search results than the products because it is not of the expected type (i.e., it is a page rather than a product), and hence the inclusion of the page in the search results does not distract the user from what he or she was likely looking for (i.e., products). FIG. 1B is a screen shot illustrating the use of a selector in a different context. Specifically, FIG. 1B depicts a web-based user interface 151 for a commercial web site selling autographs of celebrities. Thus, whereas users of the toy store of FIG. 1A would tend to search for products (e.g., toys) using the selector 105 , users of the autograph website of FIG. 1B would instead tend to search for people (i.e., the celebrities in whose autographs the users are interested). Thus, the objects of interest in FIG. 1B would typically be people, or web pages dedicated to those people. Accordingly, although the same characters (i.e., “ra”) are entered into the selector 155 of FIG. 1B , they produce a different set of search results than in FIG. 1A . Specifically, the results 160 include three web pages dedicated to people having names matching the entered characters (namely, “Ray Allend,” “Ramon Jones,” and “Alice Rafferty”), followed by a video game with a name matching the entered characters (“Daytona Racer 2012”) and included due to its large global popularity. Now that examples of selectors have been provided, system architectures and techniques for implementing the selectors are discussed below. System Architecture FIG. 2 is a high-level block diagram of a computing environment according to one embodiment. FIG. 2 illustrates a social networking system 200 , a client device 280 , and a third party website 290 connected by a network 270 . A user of the client device 280 interacts with the social networking system 200 via an application such as a web browser, performing operations such as browsing content, posting messages, performing queries for people or other content of interest, and the like. The user can also use the client device 280 to interact with the third party website 290 . Additionally, the third party website 290 can also interact with the social networking system 200 to obtain or to display data of the social networking system, either directly or indirectly. The social networking system 200 comprises a number of components used to store information on objects represented in or by the social networking environment, and on the relationships of the objects. The social networking system 200 additionally comprises components to enable clients of the system—such as a human user of the client device 280 interactively using the system, or a component of the third party website 290 requesting information using an externalization module 250 (described further below)—to query the system for information of interest. More specifically, the social networking system 200 comprises an object store 210 that stores information on various objects tracked by the social networking system 200 . These objects may represent a variety of things with which a user may interact in the social networking system 200 , including, without limitation, other users 211 of the social networking system (represented, e.g., as a profile object for the user), applications 212 (e.g., a game playable within the social networking system), events 213 (e.g., a concert that users may attend), groups 214 to which users may belong, pages 215 (e.g., pages constituting a particular person or organization's presence on the system, such as pages about the fictitious celebrity “Ray Allend,” or pages about different aspects of a restaurant), fields 225 (discrete units of semantically-meaningful information on a page, such as the hours of operation or the telephone number listed on a business page), items of media 216 (e.g., pictures, videos, audio, text, or any other type of media content), locations 217 associated with a user (e.g., “San Jose, Calif., USA”), and concepts 218 or other terms (e.g., an object corresponding to the concept “Victorian literature,” or to the product “Razor scooter”). In one embodiment, the object store 210 also stores object selectors 219 , which are objects used to query, display, and select other objects in the object store 210 , as described further below with respect to FIG. 4 . The object store 210 may further store objects representing other data routinely produced by users of the social networking system 200 , such as inbox messages, status updates, comments, notes, and postings. An object in the object store 210 may represent an entity existing within the social networking system (e.g., an application 212 available on the social networking system), a virtual entity that exists outside the domain of the social networking system (e.g., a website), or a real-world entity (e.g., a person, a sports team, or a retail store). The object store 210 may store all of the objects existing within the social networking system 200 , such as the code of an application 212 , or the image data associated with an image media item 216 . Alternatively, for virtual entities existing outside of the social networking system 200 , the object store 210 may contain some form of pointer or reference to the entities, such as the uniform resource locator (URL) of an external media item 216 . Additionally, the object store 210 may also store metadata associated with the objects, such as a name describing the object (e.g. “Ray Allend” for a person, “Birthday Reminder” for an application, or “Penguin Fanciers” for a group), an image representing the object (e.g., a user profile picture), or one or more tags assigned to the object by users (e.g. the textual strings “game”, “crime”, and “strategy” for a strategy game application). Different types of objects may have different types of metadata, such as a set of associated users 211 for a group 214 , a media type (e.g., “video”) for a media item object 216 , and a unique user ID and name tokens (e.g., separate first and last names “Ray” and “Allend”) for a user object 211 . In one embodiment, the object store 210 associates an object type with each object. The types may be a single atomic type, or they may be compound types describing a hierarchy of related types or sub-types. For example, a user object 211 (for which no further qualifications are needed) might have the type “User,” whereas a page object 215 representing a Japanese restaurant might have the type “Page.Business.Restaurant.Japanese,” representing that the object is a page, and more specifically, a page representing a business, and yet more specifically a restaurant business, and still more specifically a Japanese restaurant business. In one embodiment, the social networking system 200 captures the relationship of various types of objects in a type graph 221 that can be used to categorize pages 215 or other types of objects, fields 225 within individual pages 215 , and the like. FIG. 3 depicts one example of such a hierarchy for the type graph 221 . In the example, “Object” is the universally-applicable type from which all others derive, and “Page” 302 (the type of page objects 215 ) and “Concept” 304 (the type of concept objects 218 ) are two of the types of objects in the object store 210 . In turn, “Business” 305 , “Arts,” and “Sports” are broad top-level types 218 , and the type “Business” has sub-types “Restaurant” and “Bookstore” (two examples of commercial entities), and “Restaurant” still further has sub-types “Japanese” and “Italian” (representing different types of cuisine in which restaurants can specialize). Similarly, the “Concept” type in turn has a sub-type “Product” (representing items for sale), and “Product” in turn has its own sub-type “Toy” (representing a particular type of item for sale). Thus, the hierarchy relates different types as generalizations or specializations of other types. In one embodiment, each type applicable to a page 215 in the type graph 221 —e.g., the Page type 302 of FIG. 3 , and its various sub-types—can have associated field types 303 that specify properties that the page type has, or may have. In the example of FIG. 3 , for instance, the “Business” page type 305 has associated field types “Map,” “Hours,” and “Telephone” 306 , which respectively represent a map of the business location, the times of day that the business is open to customers and the telephone number at which the business can be reached. Further, the “Restaurant” page type 307 has the associated field type “Menu,” which represents a set of food items that a given restaurant serves. In one embodiment, the field types 303 themselves are implemented as concepts 304 . In one embodiment, “child” types inherit the fields of their “ancestor” types, such as the “Restaurant” page type 307 also having the Map, Hours, and Telephone fields of the “Business” parent type. In one embodiment, the hierarchy is manually created by the operators of the social networking system 200 . In other embodiments, the hierarchy is generated dynamically, either partially or entirely. For example, the discussion of FIG. 6 , below, includes a description of the dynamic association of fields 225 with other types in the type graph 221 . It is appreciated that the hierarchy of FIG. 3 is purely for purposes of example, and that in practice a type hierarchy could have any number of types and/or fields, arranged in any manner. Returning again to FIG. 2 , in one embodiment the social networking system 200 further comprises a graph information store 220 that represents the objects of the object store 210 as nodes that are linked together in a “social graph.” The graph information store 220 thus comprises information about the relationships between or among the objects, represented as the edges connecting the various object nodes. Various examples of edges in the social graph include: an edge between two user objects 211 representing that the users have a relationship in the social networking system (e.g., are friends, or have communicated, viewed the other's profile, or interacted in some way), an edge between a user object 211 and an application object 212 representing that the user has used the application, and an edge between a user object 211 and a group object 214 representing that the user belongs to the group, and an edge between a user object 211 and a page object 215 representing that the user has viewed the page. For example, if one user 211 establishes a relationship with another user in the social networking system, the two users are each represented as a node, and the edge between them represents the established relationship; the two users are then said to be connected in the social network system. Continuing this example, one of these users may send a message to the other user within the social networking system. This act of sending the message is another edge between those two nodes, which can be stored and/or tracked by the social networking system. The message itself may be treated as a node. In another example, one user may tag another user in an image that is maintained by the social networking system. This tagging action may create edges between the users as well as an edge between each of the users and the image, which is also a node. In yet another example, if a user confirms attending an event, the user and the event are nodes, where the indication of whether or not the user will attend the event is the edge. Using a social graph, therefore, a social networking system may keep track of many different types of objects and edges (the interactions and connections among those objects), thereby maintaining an extremely rich store of socially relevant information. In one embodiment, edges in the graph information store 220 have associated metadata, such as a label describing the type of relationship (e.g., “friend” as the label between two user objects), and/or a value quantifying the strength of the relationship. Further, a relationship degree, or “distance,” between any two objects can be ascertained by determining the number of edges on the shortest path between the objects. For example, two user objects that have an edge between them (e.g., denoting a friendship relationship) have a relationship degree (or “distance”) of one and are considered first-order connections. Similarly, if a user object A is a first-order connection of user object B but not of user object C, and B is a first-order connection of C, then objects A and C have a relationship degree of two, indicating that C is a second-order connection of A (and vice-versa). Pages 215 may also be associated with corresponding specific types, such as a page dedicated to a particular restaurant business specializing in Japanese cuisine being associated with the specific type “Object.Page.Business.Restaurant.Japanese,” as depicted in FIG. 3 . Thus, in one embodiment the graph information store 220 includes a set of page-type associations 222 , each association relating a particular page 215 to a corresponding type. In one embodiment, the page-type associations 222 are specified manually by the creators of the pages. In one such embodiment, at the time of page creation the social networking system 200 provides the creator of a page 215 with the opportunity to specify a concept 218 that the page represents, and the page-type associations 222 are updated accordingly. In one embodiment, the social networking system 200 presents the creator of the page with a series of choices corresponding to type/sub-type relationships embodied by the type graph 221 . Referring to the example of FIG. 3 , the social networking system 200 might first present a page creator creating a page about a Japanese restaurant with a choice of whether the page is about business, arts, or sports. In response to the answer “business,” the social networking system 200 would then present the creator with the choice of whether the page is more specifically about a restaurant or a bookstore, and so forth, until the final type “Japanese” is arrived at. (In one embodiment, the type is represented as the entire “path” of types and sub-types, such as Object→Page→Business→Restaurant→Japanese.) Selectors 219 may be embedded in any number of different types of pages 215 , each page potentially representing a different context. Additionally, different selectors may be embedded within the same page, such as one selector on a restaurant page for selecting food items on the menu, and one for selecting the different songs typically played by the restaurant. To track the different contexts of the different selectors, in one embodiment the graph information 220 additionally comprises selector-type associations 223 that specify associations between particular selectors 219 and a set of one or more corresponding types that acts as a context that influences selector output. For example, referring back to FIG. 1A , the selector 105 might be associated with a context that includes the “Product” type of FIG. 3 , or its more specific “Toy” sub-type, given that the purpose of the selector 105 is to select names of objects relevant to toys to be purchased. In contrast, the selector 155 of FIG. 1B might be associated with the “User” or “Page” types of FIG. 3 , given that its purpose is to select names of celebrities (e.g., users 211 of the social networking system 200 , or pages 215 devoted to the celebrities). Selector Implementation The selector-type associations 223 may be determined in different ways in different embodiments. For example, in one embodiment page creators manually specify one or more associated types for each selector 219 that they add to their pages 215 , e.g., by answering a series of questions based on the type graph 221 . (For example, a type for the selector 215 could be obtained by a series of questions such as “Do your users wish to find other users, pages, fields, or concepts?”; “Does the concept relate to products or literature?”; “Is the product a toy or hardware?”) In many instances, it is appropriate for a page creator to manually specify the type(s) associated with a selector. In other cases, however, the page creator may not wish to take the time to specify the associated types, or the page creator may not know ahead of time which types of objects the selector will typically be used to select. Thus, in another embodiment the social networking system 200 comprises a selector context learning module 260 that learns the selector context—that is, one or more types of particular relevance to a given selector based on previous user selections using the selector. In this embodiment, the page creator may add a particular selector to a page 215 without any manually specified context. As a result, when users use the selector to select objects, the selector initially does not adjust the search results based on the context. However, the selector context learning module 260 monitors the types of the objects selected from the selector result set and determines the types that should be associated with the selector based on counts of the different selected types. FIG. 4 is a flowchart depicting the operations that the selector context learning module 260 performs when learning the type(s) associated with a given selector 219 , according to one embodiment. Initially, there is no context—that is, no object types—associated with the selector. The selector 219 receives 410 input, such as the typed characters “ra” in FIG. 1A . The selector 219 then identifies 420 a result set consisting of objects matching the received input, such as all objects (or some subset thereof) having a name with at least one word beginning with the typed characters. Alternatively, the object names need not begin with the typed characters, but may have the typed characters anywhere within the object names; e.g., “ra” would also match “Grape” as well as “Ray”. When identifying 420 and/or modifying the result set, the selector 219 may optionally also take into account information in the social networking system 200 about the user providing the query input that can be used to determine an estimated degree of the user for the various objects in the result set. This user information may include connections of the user in the graph information store 220 , such as other users 211 with whom the user has a friend relationship either directly or indirectly, media items 216 that the user has viewed, a geographic or graph distance between the user and an object in the result set, and the like. For example, referring back to FIG. 1B , the web page for the person “Ramon Jones” 160 B could be omitted from the results 160 if neither the user entering the query nor his connections (e.g., friends) with a relationship degree of 2 or less has ever interacted with the page 160 B, expressed an interest in a concept 218 represented by the page, or the like. The user information may also include actions that the user has performed on the social networking system 200 , such as voting in polls, specifying data in the user's profile, viewing a particular page, and the like. (In some embodiments, an action of a user 211 with respect to another object in the object store 210 of the social networking system 200 may be represented as a connection in the graph information 220 , such as a connection between a user 211 and a page 215 representing that the user viewed the page.) The objects in the result set can be ranked in any number of ways, e.g., according to factors such as object global popularity across all users, distance from the searching user to the object in the object graph of the graph information store 220 , and the like. The selector 219 then receives 430 a user selection of one of the objects in the result set, and determines 440 the type associated with that selected object (e.g., by examining a type attribute associated with the object). Operations 410 - 440 may occur a number of times, until the context learning module 260 has obtained enough data to identify an associated type for the selector. For example, in one embodiment, the selector context learning module 260 identifies, as the primary associated type for a selector, any type for which associated objects are selected using the selector over 50% of the time, and at least 3 times in total; a type is identified as a secondary type of it is selected using the selector over 25% of the time, and at least 2 times in total. Once the context learning module 260 has enough data to identify one or more associated types, it associates the type(s) with the selector 219 via the selector-type associations 223 . In one embodiment, the selector context learning module 260 considers all selections of objects, by any user, thus determining the selector context from aggregate user behavior. In other embodiments, the selector context learning module 260 instead personalizes the selector context for each user by taking into account only the selections of that user for that selector. For example, assume that “Video game” and “Scooter” are both sub-types of a general “Toy” type of FIG. 3 . Further assume that a particular selector is associated with type “Toy”, and a particular user usually selects toys of type “Video game,” specifically, from search results in the selector, but that may not be the case for most users of that selector. In such a case, the selector context learning module 260 might associate the type of that selector to “Video game” for that particular user, but not for all users. Thus, when that particular user enters queries into that selector, they will be biased to display video games—which is presumably the preferred toy of that user—thereby presenting the user with more relevant results. As a concrete example of the operations of FIG. 4 , referring back to FIG. 1A , assume that the selector 105 used to search the toy store's inventory were added to the page without any initial associated context. If the selector 105 receives 410 the characters “ra” due to user keystrokes in the selector text area, the selector would then identify 420 a result set of objects with names containing words beginning with “ra,” without regard to the types of the objects. For example, the result 110 E corresponding to the person “Ray Allend” might be ranked first due its corresponding popularity, even though it does not correspond to an object of type “Toy,” or even of type Product. Similarly, the result set might include an object named “Rat” of type “Animal” and an object named “RATATOUILLE” of type “Movie,” even though these objects are not of type “Toy.” However, if the first three uses of the selector resulted in the selector 105 receiving 430 selections of objects that were all of type “Toy,” the selector context learning module 260 might determine 440 that the selector context includes the type “Toy” and associate 450 “Toy” as the primary context type of the selector. After this, the result sets obtained from that selector would be biased towards type “Toy,” e.g., by ranking objects of type “Toy” more highly in the result set, as illustrated in the result set of FIG. 1A . Thus, for example, a subsequent query for the characters “ra” might (as in FIG. 1A ) result in the toy objects “Razor scooter,” “Ray gun,” “Car race track,” and “Randomized game” (as well as the non-toy, but globally-popular, page for the person “Ray Allend”), and a query for the characters “ro” might result in the toy objects “Rocket” and “Robot.” In one embodiment, the selector context learning module 260 employs a hybrid approach, assigning an initial context for a selector but changing the context subject to subsequent user selections indicating that the initial assignment was inaccurate. For example, the page creator of the autograph business of FIG. 1B might set the primary type for the selector 155 to “User” (a user of the social networking system 200 ), whereas the users far more often select objects of type “Page,” corresponding to pages 215 dedicated to the celebrities in question (who may or may not be users of the social networking system). In such a case, the selector context learning module 260 would alter the primary associated type from “User” to “Page” after receiving a number of user selections of type “Page” from the selector result sets. As another example, the selector context learning module 260 might set the default context for a page based on the type of the page. For example, the default context for a page of type “Business” could be set to include the type “Product,” reflecting that selectors on business pages are typically used to find products. However, for a selector on a business page intended to be used to identify store locations in given cities, the selector context learning module 260 could change the context to instead include the type “Location,” based on user selections of Location objects initially displayed towards the bottom of the result set. As another example, the selector context learning module 260 might not completely change the type associated with a selector, but merely refine it to a sub-type, such as changing “Toy” to “Video game”, as discussed above. Once a particular selector 219 has an associated context—e.g., due to the selector context learning module 260 learning the context—the selector can apply that context to display more useful search results to users. FIG. 5 is a flowchart depicting the operations performed by a selector 219 in response to a search for objects, according to one embodiment. The selector 219 receives 510 input and identifies 520 a result set of objects matching that input, as described above with respect to operations 410 - 420 of FIG. 4 . The selector 219 then identifies 530 the types of the objects in the result set, as described above with respect operations 440 . The selector 219 also identifies 540 the type or types that make up the context associated with the selector, e.g., as learned by the selector context learning module 260 . A selector 219 can modify 550 the result set based on the selector context in different manners in different embodiments. In one embodiment, a selector 219 filters out—from the result set of objects that match the search characters entered into the selector—any objects having a type that does not match any type within the selector context. (In embodiments such as that of FIG. 3 , where the types are arranged hierarchically into super types and subtypes, the type of an object is said to match a type within the selector context if the object type is the same as, or a subtype of, the type within the selector context. For example, the object type “Restaurant” in FIG. 3 would match the selector context type “Business” because “Restaurant” is a subtype of “Business.”) In other embodiments, a selector 219 does not filter out result set objects with types not matching the selector context, but rather adjusts ranking scores of the objects. For example, a selector 219 could penalize an object by some predetermined amount or percentage for lacking a matching type. This causes objects without matching types to tend to be ranked lower in the result set than they would be if selector context were not taken into account. In another embodiment, objects without matching types are assigned to a secondary group of objects, none of which are displayed earlier in the result set than any of the displayed objects with matching types. Thus, for example, the celebrity “Ray Allend” of FIG. 1A , although not of type “Toy,” is still shown within the result set, but is displayed after every one of the four objects that are of type “Toy.” Either of these approaches allows important objects of other types to continue to be displayed, providing the user with other possible options while still prominently displaying the objects expected to best match the search context. Providing other options allows the context of the selector to be re-learned over time if users begin selecting objects of types different from those typically selected at an earlier date. The selector 219 can also adjust ranking scores within those types that are part of its context. For example, objects of the result set matching the primary associated type can be ranked more highly than those matching a secondary associated type. In one embodiment, the ranking scores of the objects are not calculated solely upon whether the object types match a type within the selector context, but rather on how closely the types match. In one embodiment, the closeness of the match is determined by a shortest graph distance between the types in the type graph 221 . For example, referring back to FIG. 3 , if the context of a particular selector 219 had the type Object.Page.Business.Restaurant.Japanese, and an object in the initial result set (based only on a textual character match) were of type Object.Page.Business.Restaurant.Italian, the closeness would reflect a distance of 2, i.e., the number of transitions to go from one node to the closest common parent and thence to the other node. Referring again to FIG. 2 , in one embodiment the social networking system 200 includes an externalization module 250 that allows third party systems external to the social networking system to query the social networking system for objects of interest, e.g., via a selector 219 . Thus, the use of selectors 219 (for example) need not be confined to the social networking system 200 itself; rather, any external web site can create a customized search interface that leverages the data of the social networking system. For example, in one embodiment the externalization module 250 provides code that a third party can include on the third party's web page, the code causing creation of an iframe that loads a URL in the domain of the social networking system 200 . The URL itself can include information (e.g., in key-value pairs) that the social networking system 200 can use to determine what content to render in the iframe. For example, when rendering a selector 219 in an iframe, the URL for the iframe can include a selector identifier that tells the social networking system 200 which particular selector to display, and the social network system can also learn the object type associated with the selector by tracking the object types chosen via the selector having that identifier. Since the iframe is in the domain of the social networking system 200 , the social networking system has access to the cookies of the user of the social networking system, e.g., for obtaining information such as username. Thus, the social networking system can optionally access the user's connections from the graph information store 220 and use them to modify the results of queries entered via the selector, as described above. Referring to FIG. 1A , the selector 105 used to search for Toy objects could be implemented as an iframe loading content from the domain of the social networking system 200 and embedded in the web page of an external third party web site focusing on toy sales, for example. In this example, the iframe might be specified by HTML code such as <iframe src=“http://www.socialnet.com/objquery/id=1383922”></iframe>, specifying that the selector with ID 1383922 from the social network at www.socialnet.com should be displayed. The externalization module 250 may be implemented in other ways in other embodiments, such as a web services-based API that explicitly makes calls to the social network system 200 for data matching certain criteria, such as objects with given name prefixes and given object types. Application: Field Selection and Learning Pages 215 may have associated fields 225 , i.e., discrete portions of data describing aspects of the given page, such as an “hours” field specifying the hours of operation of a business page, or a “menu” field specifying the food served by the restaurant that is the subject of a restaurant page. In one embodiment, each of the various possible fields is represented as an object 225 in the object store 210 , rather than merely as a snippet of text or other primitive data type, and is thus referred to hereafter as a field object 225 . Each field object 225 has a corresponding field type 303 in the type graph 221 , such as the “Map,” “Hours,” “Telephone,” or “Menu” fields depicted in FIG. 3 , and can have one or more values representing the data for that field type (e.g., the text “555-555-1234” for the “Telephone” field type). The social networking system 200 can provide a page administrator user interface that allows an administrator of the different pages 215 for an entity on the social networking system to specify the field objects 225 or other information that should be on each page. Selectors 219 provide an administrator with one way to quickly specify relevant types of field objects 225 to be added to a page. For example, FIG. 6 illustrates a sample page administrator user interface 600 for a fictional bookstore, “Lib books.” A user has typed the character ‘m’ into a selector 605 with a context having a primary (or only) associated type of “field.” Accordingly, the selector 605 has displayed a result set 606 of Field objects 303 stored in the type graph 221 that match the entered character ‘m’ (namely, a “Maps” field for providing the user with a map to a location, a “Music list” field for listing music genres, and a “Menu” field for listing types of food), filtering out (or assigning a low rank to) objects other than field types 303 . The administrator can then select applicable types of field objects 225 to add (e.g., a Maps field) to the administrator's pages on the social networking system 200 . In one embodiment, the social networking system 200 additionally comprises a field learning module 265 that identifies the field types 303 selected by administrators for their pages 215 (e.g., via selectors 119 ) and forms associations between those field types and pages. Specifically, the social networking system 200 comprises a set of Page-Field associations 224 in the graph information store 220 , each such association relating a particular page type 302 (e.g., a page of the Business type 305 ) to a particular field type 303 having at least some threshold degree of association with that page type and hence considered to be appropriate for that page type. In one embodiment, the field learning module 265 notes every time that an administrator adds a particular field type 303 to a page of a type not already associated with that field type in the Page-Field associations 224 . Then, after the field type has been added to that page type a sufficient number of times (e.g., a minimum number, or a minimum percentage of the total pages of that type) to establish a threshold degree of association, the field learning module 265 associates that field type 303 with that page type 302 in the Page-Field associations 244 . For example, assume that when the Business page type 305 is first created it has no association with the Telephone field type 306 representing a telephone number of the business. However, after a number of administrators have added the Telephone field type 306 to pages of type Business (or to its subtypes, such as Restaurant), the field learning module 265 creates the association 306 A between the Business page type 305 and the Telephone field type 306 . The social networking system 200 can then apply the Page-Field associations 224 to provide more useful options to administrators, including initiating an addition of a field of an appropriate field type to a page not already having a field of that field type. In one embodiment, the selectors 219 with the field type 303 in their contexts can adjust the rankings of the results based upon which field types are associated with the page type in which the selectors are embedded. Specifically, the field types 303 that are associated with the type of the page to which the selector 219 corresponds can have their rankings increased, and the field types that are not associated with that page type can have their ranking decreased. For example, the Map field type in the search result 606 of FIG. 6 could be ranked more highly than the Music list field type or the Menu field type because Map is a known field type of the Business page type 305 of FIG. 3 , and the other two fields are not. In one embodiment, the social networking system 200 can proactively suggest to an administrator of a page that the administrator add particular fields that the Page-Field associations 224 list as being associated with pages of the given page type. For example, in FIG. 6 , the user interface 600 provides links 610 suggesting that the administrator add a phone number field and/or business hours field to the pages for the “Lib books” business, since “Telephone” and “Hours” are field types known to be associated with pages of the Business type, as illustrated in the sample of FIG. 3 . Alternatively, the social networking system 200 can automatically add such fields, without requiring user permission. In one embodiment, an instance of a field type is automatically added to a page where the association between the field type and the type of the page has at least some threshold degree of strength greater than that required to create an association between a page type and a field type in the Page-Field associations 224 . For example, in one embodiment the threshold degree of strength comprises some minimum number of pages of that page type (e.g., 1000) having an instance of that field, and some minimum percentage of pages of that page type (e.g., 90%) having an instance of that field. When a field instance (e.g., a telephone number field) is automatically added to a page, the social networking system 200 may then request the page administrator to specify a value for the instance (e.g., a valid telephone number). The foregoing description of the embodiments of the invention has been presented for the purpose of illustration; it is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise forms disclosed. Persons skilled in the relevant art can appreciate that many modifications and variations are possible in light of the above disclosure. Some portions of this description describe the embodiments of the invention in terms of algorithms and symbolic representations of operations on information. These algorithmic descriptions and representations are commonly used by those skilled in the data processing arts to convey the substance of their work effectively to others skilled in the art. These operations, while described functionally, computationally, or logically, are understood to be implemented by computer programs or equivalent electrical circuits, microcode, or the like. Furthermore, it has also proven convenient at times, to refer to these arrangements of operations as modules, without loss of generality. The described operations and their associated modules may be embodied in software, firmware, hardware, or any combinations thereof. Any of the steps, operations, or processes described herein may be performed or implemented with one or more hardware or software modules, alone or in combination with other devices. In one embodiment, a software module is implemented with a computer program product comprising a computer-readable medium containing computer program code, which can be executed by a computer processor for performing any or all of the steps, operations, or processes described. Embodiments of the invention may also relate to an apparatus for performing the operations herein. This apparatus may be specially constructed for the required purposes, and/or it may comprise a general-purpose computing device selectively activated or reconfigured by a computer program stored in the computer. Such a computer program may be stored in a non-transitory tangible computer readable storage medium, or any type of non-transitory media suitable for storing electronic instructions, which may be coupled to a computer system bus. Furthermore, any computing systems referred to in the specification may include a single processor or may be architectures employing multiple processor designs for increased computing capability. Embodiments of the invention may also relate to a product that is produced by a computing process described herein. Such a product may comprise information resulting from a computing process, where the information is stored on a non-transitory, tangible computer readable storage medium and may include any embodiment of a computer program product or other data combination described herein. Finally, the language used in the specification has been principally selected for readability and instructional purposes, and it may not have been selected to delineate or circumscribe the inventive subject matter. It is therefore intended that the scope of the invention be limited not by this detailed description, but rather by any claims that issue on an application based hereon. Accordingly, the disclosure of the embodiments of the invention is intended to be illustrative, but not limiting, of the scope of the invention, which is set forth in the following claims.

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